James Webb Space Telescope Galaxy Mergers
NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has already captured countless images, but what really stands out are the galaxy mergers. Why? Astronomers have not been able to figure out why they detected light from hydrogen atoms which should have been entirely blocked by the pristine gas that formed after the Big-Bang.



Using new Webb data, they discovered small, faint objects surrounding the very galaxies that show the mysterious hydrogen emission. When this data is combined with state-of-the-art simulations of galaxies in the early Universe, theey show that the chaotic merging of these neighboring galaxies is the source of this hydrogen emission.

Sale

Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope - Portable Refractor Telescope - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Ideal...

Celestron – 70mm Travel Scope – Portable Refractor Telescope – Fully-Coated Glass Optics – Ideal…

  • SUPERIOR OPTICS: The Celestron 70mm Travel Scope features high-quality, fully-coated glass optics, a potent 70mm objective lens, a lightweight frame,…
  • POWERFUL EYEPIECES FOR UP-CLOSE VIEWING: Our telescope for astronomy beginners is equipped with two high-quality eyepieces (20mm and 10mm) that…
  • LARGE 70MM OBJECTIVE LENS: Our refractor telescope is equipped with a large 70mm aperture objective lens that provides enhanced, brighter views…

James Webb Space Telescope Galaxy Mergers Early Universe

One of the most puzzling issues that previous observations presented was the detection of light from hydrogen atoms in the very early Universe, which should have been entirely blocked by the pristine neutral gas that was formed after the Big-Bang. Many hypotheses have previously been suggested to explain the great escape of this ‘inexplicable’ emission,” said Callum Witten, University of Cambridge Researcher.

[Source]