James Webb Space Telescope Observes H II Region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)

James Webb Space Telescope Observes H II Region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)

James Webb Space Telescope H II Large Magellanic Cloud LMC
NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope recently observed the H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. This nebula, called N79, spans 1,630 light-years and is actually a region of interstellar atomic hydrogen that is ionized, as shown by Webb’s Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI).



This region is typically regarded as a younger version of the Tarantula Nebula, which suggests that N79 has a star formation efficiency that exceeds its older counterpart. What we see in this image is one of the three giant molecular cloud complexes, known as N79 South (or S1), where the ‘starburst’ pattern surrounding this bright object is a series of diffraction spikes.

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James Webb Space Telescope H II Large Magellanic Cloud LMC

At the longer wavelengths of light captured by MIRI, Webb’s view of N79 showcases the region’s glowing gas and dust. This is because mid-infrared light is able to reveal what is happening deeper inside the clouds (while shorter wavelengths of light would be absorbed or scattered by dust grains in the nebula). Some still-embedded protostars also appear in this field,” said the European Space Agency.

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Jackson Chung

A technology, gadget and video game enthusiast that loves covering the latest industry news. Favorite trade show? Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

Hubble Captures Globular Cluster NGC 2210 in Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) 157,000 Light-Years from Earth

Hubble Captures Globular Cluster NGC 2210 in Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) 157,000 Light-Years from Earth

Hubble Globular Cluster NGC 2210 Large Magellanic Cloud
Photo credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Sarajedini, F. Niederhofer
NASA / ESA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured this dazzling image of globular cluster NGC 2210 located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) around 157,000 light-years from Earth. What stands out first is the dense cluster of stars, with the brightest and most crowded ones in the center, where they are mostly a cool white color.


Hubble Globular Cluster NGC 2210 Large Magellanic Cloud
As you move towards the edges of NGC 2210, the stars become more spread out and reddish until a noticeable ‘edge’ to the cluster is reached. If you look beyond the edge, there are still many stars, more disorganized and seen on a black background. The LMC is actually a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, which means they are gravitationally bound. Since globular clusters like NGC 2210 are very stable and tightly bound, they can last a long time. This means globular clusters are often studied by astronomers in order to investigate potentially very old stellar populations.

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As well as being a source of interesting research, this old-but-relatively-young cluster is also extremely beautiful, with its highly concentrated population of stars. The night sky would look very different from the perspective of an inhabitant of a planet orbiting one of the stars in a globular cluster’s center: the sky would appear to be stuffed full of stars, in a stellar environment that is thousands of times more crowded than our own,” said the ESA.

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Author
Jackson Chung

A technology, gadget and video game enthusiast that loves covering the latest industry news. Favorite trade show? Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.