Sierra Space Dream Chaser Tenacity ISS Resupply Spacecraft
Photo credit: Sierra Space/Shay Saldana
Sierra Space’s Dream Chaser Tenacity is set to become NASA’s ISS resupply spacecraft. This lifting body spacecraft can be reused up to 15 times, and is based on the HL-20 spacecraft developed at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.



Its one-time-use cargo module companion, Shooting Star, is capable of supporting delivery and disposal of pressurized as well as unpressurized cargo to / from the International Space Station. At launch, Dream Chaser’s wings will be folded inside a five-meter fairing aboard a ULA (United Launch Alliance) Vulcan Centaur rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. These panels will protect the spacecraft during ascent but are disposed of once in orbit. Solar arrays mounted on the cargo module and wings are then deployed during its autonomous rendezvous to the space station.

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On its first flight to the International Space Station, Dream Chaser is scheduled to deliver over 7,800 pounds of cargo. On future missions, Dream Chaser is being designed to stay attached to the station for up to 75 days and deliver as much as 11,500 pounds of cargo. Cargo can be loaded onto the spacecraft as late as 24 hours prior to launch. Dream Chaser can return over 3,500 pounds of cargo and experiment samples to Earth, while over 8,700 pounds of trash can be disposed of during reentry using its cargo module,” said Leah D. Cheshier, Public Affairs at NASA.

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