NASA Stream Video Deep Space Flight Laser Transceiver
Photo credit: NASA | JPL-Caltech
Cat videos have been around online for decades, but NASA managed to stream one from deep space 19-million miles away using their cutting-edge flight laser transceiver aboard the Psyche spacecraft. More specifically, a 15-second cat video that took 101 seconds to reach Earth, sent at the system’s maximum bit rate of 267 megabits per second (Mbps).



The flight laser transceiver, capable of of sending and receiving near-infrared signals, beamed an encoded near-infrared laser to the Hale Telescope at Caltech’s Palomar Observatory in San Diego County, California, where it was then downloaded by engineers. Each individual frame from the looping video was then transmitted “live” to JPL in Pasadena, California, where the video was played in real-time.

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NASA Stream Video Deep Space Flight Laser Transceiver

Despite transmitting from millions of miles away, it was able to send the video faster than most broadband internet connections. In fact, after receiving the video at Palomar, it was sent to JPL over the internet, and that connection was slower than the signal coming from deep space. JPL’s DesignLab did an amazing job helping us showcase this technology – everyone loves Taters,” said Ryan Rogalin, Receiver Electronics Lead at JPL.

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